Preparing for your appointment

You may be referred to a specialist in female reproductive medicine (gynecologist), a specialist in hormone disorders (endocrinologist) or an infertility specialist (reproductive endocrinologist).

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

  • List symptoms you've been having, and for how long
  • List all medications, vitamins and supplements you take, including the doses
  • List key personal and medical information, including other conditions, recent life changes and stressors
  • Prepare questions to ask your doctor
  • Keep a record of your menstrual cycles

For PCOS, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What tests do you recommend?
  • How does PCOS affect my ability to become pregnant?
  • What medications do you recommend to help improve my symptoms or ability to conceive?
  • What lifestyle modifications do you recommend to help improve my symptoms or ability to conceive?
  • What are the long-term health implications of PCOS?
  • I have other medical conditions. How can I best manage them together?

During your appointment, don't hesitate to ask other questions as they occur to you.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, including:

  • What are your signs and symptoms? How often do they occur?
  • How severe are your symptoms?
  • When did each symptom begin?
  • When was your last period?
  • Have you gained weight since you first started having periods? How much weight did you gain, and when did you gain it?
  • Does anything improve or worsen your symptoms?
  • Are you trying to become pregnant, or do you wish to become pregnant?
  • Has your mother or sister ever been diagnosed with PCOS?
Aug. 29, 2017
References
  1. Lobo RA, et al. Polycystic ovary syndrome. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 28, 2017.
  2. AskMayoExpert. Polycystic ovary syndrome. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  3. Barbieri RL, et al. Clinical manifestations of polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  4. Jameson JL, et al., eds. Hyperandrogenism, hirsutism, and polycystic ovary syndrome. In: Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  5. Barbieri RL, et al. Treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  6. Barbieri RL, et al. Diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  7. Azziz R. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of the polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 28, 2017.
  8. Jones MR, et al. Genetic determinants of polycystic ovary syndrome: Progress and future directions. Fertility and Sterility. 2016;106:25.
  9. Lobo RA, et al. Anatomic defects of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor: Abdominal hernias, inguinal hernias, and pelvic organ prolapse: Diagnosis and management. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 28, 2017.
  10. Warner KJ. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 11, 2017.
  11. George JT, et al. Neurokinin B receptor antagonism in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2016;101:4313.
  12. Chang AY, et al. Influence of race/ethnicity on cardiovascular risk factors in polycystic ovary syndrome, the Dallas Heart Study. Clinical Endocrinology. 2016;85:92.
  13. Javed A, et al. Fasting glucose changes in adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome compared to obese controls: A retrospective cohort study. Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. 2016;28:451.