Diagnosis

There's no test to definitively diagnose PCOS. Your doctor is likely to start with a discussion of your medical history, including your menstrual periods and weight changes. A physical exam will include checking for signs of excess hair growth, insulin resistance and acne.

Your doctor might then recommend:

  • A pelvic exam. The doctor visually and manually inspects your reproductive organs for masses, growths or other abnormalities.
  • Blood tests. Your blood may be analyzed to measure hormone levels. This testing can exclude possible causes of menstrual abnormalities or androgen excess that mimics PCOS. You might have additional blood testing to measure glucose tolerance and fasting cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
  • An ultrasound. Your doctor checks the appearance of your ovaries and the thickness of the lining of your uterus. A wandlike device (transducer) is placed in your vagina (transvaginal ultrasound). The transducer emits sound waves that are translated into images on a computer screen.

If you have a diagnosis of PCOS, your doctor might recommend additional tests for complications. Those tests can include:

  • Periodic checks of blood pressure, glucose tolerance, and cholesterol and triglyceride levels
  • Screening for depression and anxiety
  • Screening for obstructive sleep apnea
July 26, 2017
References
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  2. AskMayoExpert. Polycystic ovary syndrome. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  3. Barbieri RL, et al. Clinical manifestations of polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  4. Jameson JL, et al., eds. Hyperandrogenism, hirsutism, and polycystic ovary syndrome. In: Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  5. Barbieri RL, et al. Treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  6. Barbieri RL, et al. Diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  7. Azziz R. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of the polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 28, 2017.
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  9. Lobo RA, et al. Anatomic defects of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor: Abdominal hernias, inguinal hernias, and pelvic organ prolapse: Diagnosis and management. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 28, 2017.
  10. Warner KJ. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 11, 2017.
  11. George JT, et al. Neurokinin B receptor antagonism in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2016;101:4313.
  12. Chang AY, et al. Influence of race/ethnicity on cardiovascular risk factors in polycystic ovary syndrome, the Dallas Heart Study. Clinical Endocrinology. 2016;85:92.
  13. Javed A, et al. Fasting glucose changes in adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome compared to obese controls: A retrospective cohort study. Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. 2016;28:451.