Expertise and rankings

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Mayo Clinic staff members work together to care for people with pancreatic cancer.

Mayo Clinic doctors are widely respected for their expertise in diagnosing and treating people with pancreatic cancer. Each year, nearly 1,800 people with pancreatic cancer seek care at Mayo Clinic.

Mayo Clinic doctors care for people from all 50 states and from numerous countries.

Mayo Clinic is recognized for excellence in pancreatic cancer treatment. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center meets strict standards for a National Cancer Institute comprehensive cancer center, which recognizes scientific excellence and a multispecialty approach focused on cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for cancer by U.S. News & World Report.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for digestive disorders in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for digestive disorders by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals for digestive disorders.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's quality rankings.

Mayo Clinic surgeon Mark J. Truty, M.D., M.S., discusses pancreatic cancer care at Mayo Clinic.

Nov. 18, 2016
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Pancreatic cancer. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  2. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  3. Niederhuber JE, et al., eds. Carcinoma of the pancreas. In: Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  4. What you need to know about cancer of the pancreas. National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/wyntk/pancreas. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  5. Distress management. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  6. Palliative care. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  7. Clark KL, et al. Psychological distress in patients with pancreatic cancer — An understudied group. Psycho-Oncology. 2010;19:1313.
  8. Tee MC, et al. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy: Is it an effective procedure for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma? Advances in Surgery. 2015;49:143.
  9. Sugumar A, et al. Distinguishing pancreatic cancer from autoimmune pancreatitis. Current Gastroenterology Reports. 2010;12:91.
  10. Pancreatic SPOREs. National Cancer Institute. http://trp.cancer.gov/spores/pancreatic.htm. Accessed. June 10, 2016.
  11. Pancreatic cancer genetic epidemiology (PACGENE) study. ClinicalTrials.gov. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00526578. Accessed June 10, 2016.
  12. Riggin ER. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Sept. 20, 2016.
  13. Ramanathan RK (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz. Aug. 30, 2016.