Treatment

Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome generally resolves on its own within a week or two or somewhat longer if you're pregnant. Treatment is aimed at keeping you comfortable, decreasing ovarian activity and avoiding complications.

Mild to moderate OHSS

Mild OHSS typically resolves on its own. Treatment for moderate OHSS may involve:

  • Anti-nausea medication, prescription painkillers or both
  • Frequent physical exams and ultrasounds
  • Daily weigh-ins and waist measurements to check for drastic changes
  • Measurements of how much urine you produce each day
  • Blood tests to monitor for dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and other problems
  • Adequate fluid intake
  • Drainage of excess abdominal fluid using a needle inserted in your abdominal cavity
  • Support stockings, to help prevent blood clots

Severe OHSS

With severe OHSS, you may need to be admitted to the hospital for monitoring and aggressive treatment, including IV fluids. Your doctor may give you a medication called cabergoline to lessen your symptoms. In some cases, your doctor may also give you another medication — known as a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) antagonist — to help suppress ovarian activity.

Serious complications may require additional treatments, such as surgery for a ruptured ovarian cyst or intensive care for liver or lung complications. You may also need anticoagulant medications to decrease the risk of blood clots in your legs.