Treatment

Fortunately, getting enough vitamin D through oral supplements for several weeks to months can cure osteomalacia. Maintaining normal blood levels of vitamin D usually requires continuing to take the supplements.

Your health care provider might also recommend that you increase your calcium or phosphorus intake, either through supplements or diet. Treating conditions that affect vitamin D metabolism, such as kidney and liver disease or low phosphate levels, often helps improve the signs and symptoms of osteomalacia.

April 29, 2017
References
  1. Drezner MK. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of osteomalacia. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 18, 2016.
  2. Osteomalacia. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/7285/osteomalacia. Accessed Dec. 18, 2016.
  3. Chen J, et al. Vitamin D deficiency and sub-clinical osteomalacia in axial spondyloarthropathy. Rheumatology. 2016;6:1.
  4. Bhan A, et al. Osteomalacia as a result of vitamin D deficiency. Rheumatology Disease Clinics of North America. 2012;38:81.
  5. Menkes CJ. Epidemiology and etiology of osteomalacia. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 18, 2016.
  6. Evaluation, treatment, and prevention of vitamin D deficiency: An Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. Chevy Chase, Md.: The Endocrine Society. http://www.endocrine.org/education-and-practice-management/clinical-practice-guidelines. Accessed Dec. 19, 2016.
  7. Vitamin D. American Academy of Dermatology. https://www.aad.org/media/stats/prevention-and-care/vitamin-d-and-uv-exposure. Accessed Dec. 19, 2016.