Treatment

Osgood-Schlatter disease usually resolves without formal treatment. Symptoms typically disappear after your child's bones stop growing.

Medications

Over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, Children's Motrin, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve) might help.

Therapy

A physical therapist can teach your child exercises to stretch the thigh's quadriceps, which can help reduce the tension where the kneecap (patella) tendon attaches to the shinbone. A patellar tendon strap also can help relieve the tension. Strengthening exercises for the quadriceps and legs in general can help stabilize the knee joint.

Surgery

In very rare cases, if pain is debilitating and doesn't subside after the growth spurt, surgery to remove the bony overgrowth might be recommended.

June 22, 2017
References
  1. DeLee JC, et al. Patellofemoral pain. In:DeLee & Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Oct. 1, 2016.
  2. Osgood-Schlatter disease (knee pain). American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00411. Accessed Oct. 1, 2016.
  3. Kienstra AJ, et al. Osgood-Schlatter disease (tibial tuberosity avulsion). http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Oct. 1, 2016.