Tests and diagnosis

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Your doctor is likely to start with a physical exam to check for enlarged lymph nodes in your groin and an enlarged testicle on the affected side. Your doctor may also do a rectal examination to check for prostate enlargement or tenderness.

After that, your doctor may recommend:

  • STI screening. A narrow swab is inserted into the end of your penis to obtain a sample of discharge from your urethra. The sample is checked in the laboratory for gonorrhea and chlamydia.
  • Urine test. A sample of your urine is analyzed for abnormalities in appearance, concentration or content.
  • Ultrasound. This imaging test may be used to rule out testicular torsion. Ultrasound with color Doppler can determine if the blood flow to your testicles is lower than normal — indicating torsion — or higher than normal, which helps confirm the diagnosis of orchitis.
  • Nuclear scan of the testicles. A radioactive tracer is inserted into your bloodstream. The scanner then maps blood flow to your testicles, which can indicate torsion or orchitis.
Sept. 09, 2014