Although you may rely on medications to relieve symptoms and control inflammation associated with occupational asthma, you can do several things on your own to maintain overall health and lessen the possibility of attacks:

  • If you smoke, quit. In addition to all its other health benefits, being smoke-free may help prevent or lesson symptoms of occupational asthma.
  • Avoid irritating gases. Occupational asthma may be worsened by exposure to industrial pollution, automobile emissions, natural gas stoves, and chlorine used in swimming pools.
  • Get regular exercise. Regular exercise can strengthen your heart and lungs so that they don't have to work so hard. If you've been inactive, start slowly and gradually increase your activity over time. Avoid exercising outdoors during pollution alerts or when the temperature is below zero. Discuss any exercise program with your doctor.
  • Minimize household allergens. Common household substances, such as mold, pollen, dust mites and pet dander, can aggravate symptoms of occupational asthma. Air conditioners, dehumidifiers and thorough cleaning practices, especially in your bedroom, can minimize your exposure to these substances and help you breathe easier.

If you have a job in a high-risk profession, in the United States your company has legal responsibilities to help protect you from hazardous chemicals. Under guidelines established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), your employer is required to do the following:

  • Inform you if you'll be working with any hazardous chemicals.
  • Train you how to safely handle these chemicals.
  • Train you how to respond to an emergency, such as a chemical spill.
  • Provide protective gear, such as masks and respirators.
  • Offer additional training if a new chemical is introduced to your workplace.

Under OSHA guidelines, your employer is required to keep a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each hazardous chemical that's used in your workplace. This is a document that must be submitted by the chemical's manufacturer to your employer. You have a legal right to see and copy such documents. If you suspect you're allergic to a certain substance, show the material safety data sheet to your doctor.

While at work, be alert for unsafe and unhealthy working conditions and report them to your supervisor. If necessary, call OSHA at 800-321-OSHA (800-321-6742) and ask for an on-site inspection. You can do this so that your name won't be revealed to your employer.

May. 19, 2011