Obstructive sleep apnea care at Mayo Clinic

  • Your Mayo Clinic care team. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in sleep medicine work together to determine the most appropriate treatment for your condition. Doctors trained in lung and breathing conditions (pulmonologists), brain and nervous system conditions (neurologists), mental health conditions (psychiatrists), pediatrics, heart disease (cardiologists), ear, nose and throat conditions (otolaryngologists), dental conditions, oral and maxillofacial surgery, and others may treat your condition.
  • Latest treatments. Mayo Clinic doctors have expertise in treating obstructive sleep apnea with nonsurgical treatments, including continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and other therapies. When necessary, referral for surgery, such as minimally invasive procedures, jaw surgery and many others, may be considered.
  • Nationally recognized expertise. Each year, nearly 30,000 people receive obstructive sleep apnea care at Mayo Clinic's accredited sleep centers.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Hospitals for pulmonology, neurology & neurosurgery, heart & heart surgery, ear, nose & throat, and psychiatry by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals in neurology & neurosurgery, pulmonology, and heart & heart surgery.

June 15, 2016
References
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  2. What is sleep apnea? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sleepapnea. Accessed March 26, 2016.
  3. Amardottir ES, et al. Nocturnal sweating — A common symptom of obstructive sleep apnoea: The Icelandic sleep apnoea cohort. BMJ Open 2013;3:1.
  4. Strohl KP. Overview of obstructive sleep apnea in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 4, 2016.
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  15. Find a sleep facility near you. American Academy of Sleep Medicine. http://www.sleepeducation.org/find-a-facility. Accessed March 26, 2016.