Diagnosis

Your doctor will examine your nails. He or she may also take some nail clippings or scrape debris from under your nail and send the sample to a lab to identify the type of fungus causing the infection.

Other conditions, such as psoriasis, can mimic a fungal infection of the nail. Microorganisms such as yeast and bacteria also can infect nails. Knowing the cause of your infection helps determine the best course of treatment.

July 26, 2017
References
  1. Onychomycosis. Merck Manual Professional Version. https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/dermatologic-disorders/nail-disorders/onychomycosis. Accessed May 15, 2017.
  2. Goldstein AO, et al. Onychomycosis: Management. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed May 15, 2017.
  3. Toenail fungus. American Podiatric Medical Association. http://www.apma.org/Learn/FootHealth.cfm?ItemNumber=1523. Accessed May 15, 2017.
  4. Varade RS, et al. Cutaneous fungal infections in the elderly. Clinics in Geriatric Medicine. 2013;29:461.
  5. Gupta AK, et al. Improved efficacy in onychomycosis therapy. Clinics in Dermatology. 2013;31:555.
  6. Westerberg DP, et al. Onychomycosis: Current trends in diagnosis and treatment. American Family Physician. 2013;88:762.
  7. AskMayoExpert. Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  8. Nail care. Natural Medicines. https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/databases/medical-conditions/n/nail-care.aspx. Accessed May 17, 2017.
  9. Gibson LE (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. June 6, 2017.