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Nov. 02, 2016
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Primary myelofibrosis. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  2. Kaushansky K, et al., eds. Primary myelofibrosis. In: Williams Hematology. 9th ed. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education; 2016. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Sept. 22, 2016.
  3. Hoffman R, et al. Primary myelofibrosis. In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2013. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 22, 2016.
  4. Tefferi A. Myeloproliferative neoplasms: A decade of discoveries and treatment advances. American Journal of Hematology. 2016;91:50.
  5. Thorium. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/tf.asp?id=659&tid=121. Accessed Sept. 22, 2016.
  6. Jakafi (prescribing information). Wilmington, Del.: Incyte Corp.; 2016. http://www.jakafi.com. Accessed Sept. 22, 2016.
  7. Blood-forming stem cell transplants. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/types/stem-cell-transplant/stem-cell-fact-sheet. Accessed Sept. 22, 2016.
  8. Mesa RA. The evolving treatment paradigm in myelofibrosis. Leukemia & Lymphoma. 2013;2:242.
  9. Tefferi A, et al. One thousand patients with primary myelofibrosis: The Mayo Clinic experience. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2012;87:25.
  10. Palliative care. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed Sept. 22, 2016.
  11. Riggin ER. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 19, 2016.