Expertise and rankings

Moyamoya disease specialists at Mayo Clinic Moyamoya disease specialists at Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic doctors work together as a team to provide comprehensive care for people with moyamoya disease.

Experience

Mayo Clinic doctors have extensive experience in diagnosing and treating moyamoya disease. Each year, Mayo Clinic doctors evaluate and treat about 70 people with this rare condition.

Advanced surgical techniques

Mayo Clinic surgeons treat moyamoya disease using several sophisticated surgical techniques, including direct and indirect revascularization procedures. Types of indirect revascularization procedures include encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS) or encephalomyosynangiosis (EMS), or a combination of both.

Mayo Clinic surgeons also use the latest in 3-D imaging to continuously refine and improve their technique and outcomes.

Interdisciplinary moyamoya disease care at Mayo Clinic Interdisciplinary moyamoya disease care at Mayo Clinic

At Mayo Clinic, experts from many disciplines provide highly specialized care for people with moyamoya disease.

Research

Mayo Clinic neurologists, neurosurgeons, geneticists and others actively research causes, diagnostic tests and new treatments for moyamoya disease and other brain and blood vessel conditions (cerebrovascular diseases).

A variety of clinical trials and other clinical studies may be available to you at Mayo Clinic.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for neurology and neurosurgery in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's neurosurgery and neurology departments' expertise and rankings.

June 09, 2017
References
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