Treatment

MGUS doesn't require treatment. But your doctor is likely to recommend periodic checkups to monitor your health, probably starting six months after your diagnosis.

Watchful waiting

If you are at high risk of developing a more-serious condition, your doctor may recommend more frequent checkups so that any progression can be diagnosed and treatment started as soon as possible.

Your doctor is likely to watch for the development of signs and symptoms including:

  • Pain
  • Fatigue or weakness
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Fever or night sweats
  • Headache, dizziness, nerve pain, or changes in vision or hearing
  • Bleeding
  • Anemia or other blood abnormalities
  • Swollen lymph nodes, liver or spleen
  • Heart and kidney problems

Medications

If you have osteoporosis, your doctor might recommend a medication (bisphosphonate) to increase bone density. Examples include alendronate (Binosto, Fosamax), risedronate (Actonel, Atelvia), ibandronate (Boniva) and zoledronic acid (Reclast, Zometa).

April 27, 2016
References
  1. Rajkumar SV. Diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  2. Rajkumar SV. Clinical course and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  3. Ferri FF. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  4. Glavey SV, et al. Monoclonal gammopathy: The good, the bad and the ugly. Blood Reviews. In press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.blre.2015.12.001. Accessed Feb. 18, 2016.
  5. Goldman L, et al., eds. Plasma cell disorders. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  6. AskMayoExpert. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) prevalence. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  7. Kyle RA, et al. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma. Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America. 2014;28:775.
  8. Sethi S, et al. Spectrum of manifestations of monoclonal gammopathy-associated renal syndromes. Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension. 2016;25:127.
  9. AskMayoExpert. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  10. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 13, 2016.