Preparing for your appointment

You may be referred to a doctor who specializes in blood disorders (hematologist).

It's a good idea to be well-prepared for your appointment. Here's some information to help you get ready, and what to expect from your doctor.

What you can do

  • List any symptoms you're experiencing, including those that may seem unrelated to the reason you scheduled the appointment.
  • List key personal information, including any major stresses or recent life changes.
  • List all medications, vitamins or supplements you take, including doses.
  • Ask a family member or friend to come with you. Sometimes it can be difficult to remember all of the information provided to you during an appointment. Someone who accompanies you may remember something that you missed or forgot.
  • List questions to ask your doctor.

For MGUS, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What kinds of tests do I need?
  • Do these tests require any special preparation?
  • How frequently do I need to schedule follow-up visits and testing?
  • Do you recommend any treatment or lifestyle changes?
  • I have other health conditions. How can I best manage these conditions together?

Don't hesitate to ask other questions you have.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, including:

  • Do you have any numbness or tingling in your hands and feet?
  • Do you have osteoporosis?
  • Do you have a family history of MGUS?
  • Have you ever had a blood clot?
  • Have you ever experienced a broken bone?
  • Have you ever had cancer?
April 27, 2016
References
  1. Rajkumar SV. Diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  2. Rajkumar SV. Clinical course and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  3. Ferri FF. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  4. Glavey SV, et al. Monoclonal gammopathy: The good, the bad and the ugly. Blood Reviews. In press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.blre.2015.12.001. Accessed Feb. 18, 2016.
  5. Goldman L, et al., eds. Plasma cell disorders. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  6. AskMayoExpert. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) prevalence. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  7. Kyle RA, et al. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma. Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America. 2014;28:775.
  8. Sethi S, et al. Spectrum of manifestations of monoclonal gammopathy-associated renal syndromes. Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension. 2016;25:127.
  9. AskMayoExpert. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  10. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 13, 2016.