Researchers at Mayo Clinic coined the term "monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance" (MGUS) when they originally identified this condition. Mayo Clinic researchers are studying MGUS to better understand it and to improve treatment options.

Mayo Clinic researchers are actively studying the epidemiology of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. That means they're looking at how many people have the condition, and what the risk factors are for developing monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. They're also studying how risk factors for the disease may influence its treatment.

A risk-assessment model has been developed by Mayo Clinic researchers. It can predict risk of progression of MGUS to multiple myeloma. Mayo Clinic is also studying ways of preventing progression of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to myeloma.

Doctors and scientists in the Hematology Program of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center are working on improving the diagnosis and treatment of myeloma and other blood disorders. Learn about research in the Mayo Clinic Hematologic Malignancies Program.

Laboratory scientists at Mayo Clinic continue to study the roles that genetic factors, growth factors for cells (cytokines) and new blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) play in the initiation and progression of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

Publications

See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic doctors on monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

May. 17, 2013