Self-management

Coping and support

Being diagnosed with a meningioma can be overwhelming. As you come to terms with your diagnosis, your life can be turned upside down with visits to doctors and surgeons as you prepare for your treatment. To help you cope, try to:

  • Learn everything you can about meningiomas. Ask your health care team where you can get more information about meningiomas and your treatment options. Visit your local library and ask a librarian to help you track down reliable resources for more information, including online sources.

    Write down your questions so that you'll remember to ask them at your next appointment with your doctor. The more you know about your condition, the better prepared you'll be to make decisions about your treatment.

  • Build a support network. Having friends and family supporting you can be valuable. You may find it helps to have someone to talk to about your emotions. Other people who may provide support include social workers and psychologists — ask your doctor for a referral if you feel that you need someone else to talk to. Talk with your pastor, rabbi or other spiritual leader.

    Other people with meningiomas can offer a unique perspective, so consider joining a support group — whether it's in your community or online. Ask your health care team about brain tumor or meningioma support groups in your area, or contact the American Brain Tumor Association.

  • Take care of yourself. Try to stay healthy during your treatment for a meningioma by taking care of yourself. Eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and get moderate exercise daily if your doctor allows it. Get enough sleep so that you wake feeling rested.

    Reduce stress in your life by focusing on what's important to you. These measures won't cure your meningioma, but they may help you feel better as you recover from surgery or help you to cope during radiation therapy.

Aug. 23, 2017
References
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