Preparing for your appointment

You're likely to start by seeing your family doctor or a general practitioner. If your doctor suspects you may have a brain tumor, such as a meningioma, you may be referred to specialists who treat brain disorders (neurologist and neurosurgeon).

Here's some information to help you prepare for your appointment.

What you can do

  • Be aware of any pre-appointment restrictions. At the time you make the appointment, be sure to ask if there's anything you need to do in advance, such as restrict your diet.
  • Write down any symptoms you're experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for which you scheduled the appointment.
  • Write down key personal information, including any major stresses or recent life changes.
  • Make a list of all medications, as well as any vitamins or supplements, you're taking.
  • Take a family member or friend along, if possible. Sometimes it can be difficult to absorb all the information provided during an appointment. Someone who accompanies you may remember something you missed.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.

Preparing a list of questions will help you make the most of your time with your doctor. For a meningioma, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • Is my meningioma cancerous?
  • How large is my meningioma?
  • Is my meningioma growing? How quickly?
  • What treatments do you recommend?
  • Do I need treatment now, or is it better to take a wait-and-see approach?
  • What are the potential complications of each treatment?
  • Are there long-term complications I should know about?
  • Should I seek a second opinion? Can you recommend another doctor or hospital that has experience in treating meningiomas?
  • Are there any brochures or other printed material that I can take with me? What websites do you recommend?
  • Do I need to make a decision about treatment right away? How long can I wait?

Don't hesitate to ask any other questions you have as well.

May 10, 2017
References
  1. Prayson RA. Non-Glial Tumors. In: Neuropathology. 2rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Limited. 2012. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 26, 2017.
  2. Ferri FF. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 19, 2017.
  3. Meningiomas. American Association of Neurological Surgeons. http://www.aans.org/Patient%20Information/Conditions%20and%20Treatments/Meningiomas.aspx. Accessed Jan. 19, 2017.
  4. Park JK, et al. Management of known or presumed benign (WHO grade I) meningioma. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 19, 2017.
  5. Riggin ER. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Nov. 3, 2016.
  6. Park JK, et al. Epidemiology, pathology, clinical features, and diagnosis of meningioma. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 19, 2017.
  7. Meningioma. American Brain Tumor Association. http://www.abta.org/understanding-brain-tumors/types-of-tumors/meningioma.html. Accessed Jan. 19, 2017.
  8. Ding D, et al. The role of radiosurgery in the management of WHO grade II and III intracranial meningiomas. Neurosurgery Focus. 2013;35:E16.
  9. Chronic pain and CAM: At a glance. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. http://nccam.nih.gov/health/pain/chronic.htm. Accessed Jan. 19, 2017.