Preparing for your appointment

You'll likely start by seeing your primary care doctor. He or she may refer you to a doctor who specializes in skin diseases (dermatologist).

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Before your appointment make a list of:

  • Symptoms you've been having and for how long
  • All medications, vitamins and supplements you take, including the doses
  • Questions to ask your doctor

For lichen planus, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • Are there other possible causes?
  • Do I need any tests?
  • How long will these skin changes last?
  • What treatments are available, and which do you recommend?
  • What side effects can I expect from treatment?
  • I have these other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?
  • Are there any restrictions that I need to follow?
  • Should I see a specialist?
  • Is there a generic alternative to the medicine you're prescribing?
  • Do you have any brochures or other printed material I can take with me? What websites do you recommend?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • Where on your body have you found the lesions?
  • Are the affected areas itchy, painful or uncomfortable?
  • How would you describe the severity of the pain or discomfort — mild, moderate or severe?
  • Have you recently started new medications?
  • Have you recently had immunizations?
  • Do you have any allergies?
Feb. 23, 2016
References
  1. Le Cleach L, et al. Lichen planus. New England Journal of Medicine. 2012;366:723.
  2. Sharma A, et al. Lichen planus: An update and review. Cutis. 2012;90:17.
  3. Usatine RP, et al. Diagnosis and treatment of lichen planus. American Family Physician. 2011;84:53.
  4. Ferri FF. Lichen planus. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 11, 2015.
  5. Bradford J, et al. Management of vulvovaginal lichen planus: A new approach. Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease. 2013;17:28.
  6. Pizzorno JE, et al. Lichen planus. In: Textbook of Natural Medicine. 4th ed. St. Louis, Mo.: Elsevier; 2013.
  7. Habif TP. Psoriasis and other papulosquamous diseases. In: Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide to Diagnosis and Therapy. 6th ed. Edinburgh, U.K.; Maryland Heights, Mo.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 11, 2015.
  8. Goldsmith LA, et al., eds. Lichen planus. In: Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012.
  9. Sartori-Valinotti JC, et al. A 10-year review of otic lichen planus: The Mayo Clinic experience. JAMA Dermatology. 2013;149:1082.
  10. Cheng S, et al. Interventions for erosive lichen planus affecting mucosal sites. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. http://ovidsp.tx.ovid.com/sp-3.18.0b/ovidweb.cgi. Accessed Dec. 17, 2015.
  11. Pickert A. Concise review of lichen planus and lichenoid dermatoses. Cutis. 2012;90:e1.
  12. Gibson LE (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 18, 2016.
  13. Goldstein BG, et al. Lichen planus. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 17, 2015.
  14. Honigsmann H. UVB therapy (broadband and narrowband). http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 21, 2015.
  15. Lichen planus. American Academy of Dermatology. https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/rashes/lichen-planus. Accessed Dec. 21, 2015.