Preparing for your appointment

You'll likely start by seeing your primary care doctor. He or she may refer you to a doctor who specializes in skin diseases (dermatologist).

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Before your appointment make a list of:

  • Symptoms you've been having and for how long
  • All medications, vitamins and supplements you take, including the doses
  • Questions to ask your doctor

For lichen planus, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • Are there other possible causes?
  • Do I need any tests?
  • How long will these skin changes last?
  • What treatments are available, and which do you recommend?
  • What side effects can I expect from treatment?
  • I have these other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?
  • Are there any restrictions that I need to follow?
  • Should I see a specialist?
  • Is there a generic alternative to the medicine you're prescribing?
  • Do you have any brochures or other printed material I can take with me? What websites do you recommend?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • Where on your body have you found the lesions?
  • Are the affected areas itchy, painful or uncomfortable?
  • How would you describe the severity of the pain or discomfort — mild, moderate or severe?
  • Have you recently started new medications?
  • Have you recently had immunizations?
  • Do you have any allergies?
Feb. 23, 2016
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