Diagnosis

You generally won't need to see your doctor for keratosis pilaris. If you do visit your doctor, he or she will be able to diagnose the condition by looking at the affected skin. No testing is needed.

Jan. 05, 2016
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Keratosis pilaris. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  2. Keratosis pilaris. American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html. Accessed Nov. 4, 2015.
  3. Keratosis pilaris. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/print/dermatologic_disorders/cornification_disorders/keratosis_pilaris.html. Accessed Nov. 4, 2015.
  4. Keratosis pilaris. American Academy of Dermatology. https://www.aad.org/dermatology-a-to-z/diseases-and-treatments/i---l/keratosis-pilaris/who-gets-causes. Accessed Nov. 4, 2015.
  5. Goldsmith LA, et al., eds. Keratosis pilaris and other inflammatory follicular keratotic syndromes. In: Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Nov. 4, 2015.
  6. Dermatologists' top 10 tips for relieving dry skin. American Academy of Dermatology. https://www.aad.org/dermatology-a-to-z/health-and-beauty/general-skin-care/dry-skin-tips. Accessed Nov. 4, 2015.
  7. Retin-A. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.accessdata.fda.gov. Accessed Nov. 5, 2015.
  8. Goldsmith LA, et al., eds. Epidermal growth and differentiation. In: Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Nov. 5, 2015.