Preparing for your appointment

If you're having difficulty with your vision, you'll likely start by seeing an eye doctor (ophthalmologist). If your eye doctor determines that you may need a cornea transplant, you may be referred to an ophthalmologist who has had special training in corneal surgery.

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Before your appointment make a list of:

  • Symptoms you've been having and for how long
  • Recent major stresses or life changes
  • All medications, eyedrops, vitamins and supplements you take, including the doses
  • Questions to ask your doctor

For keratoconus some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • What are other possible causes?
  • Do I need any tests?
  • Is this condition temporary?
  • What treatments are available, and which do you recommend?
  • What are the alternatives to the primary approach you're suggesting?
  • I have these other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?
  • Do you have any brochures or other printed material I can take with me? What websites do you recommend?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • What types of signs and symptoms have you been having?
  • When did you begin experiencing symptoms?
  • Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  • How severe are your symptoms?
  • Does anything seem to improve your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?
  • Does anyone in your family have keratoconus?
Jan. 30, 2016
  1. Wayman LL. Keratoconus. Accessed Nov. 24, 2015.
  2. What is keratoconus? American Academy of Ophthalmology. Accessed Nov. 24, 2015.
  3. Keratoconus treatment. American Academy of Ophthalmology. Accessed Nov. 24, 2015.
  4. van der Worp E, et al. Modern scleral contact lenses: A review. Contact Lens & Anterior Eye. 2014;37:240.
  5. Raiskup F, et al. Corneal collagen crosslinking with riboflavin and ultraviolet-A light in progressive keratoconus: Ten-year results. Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. 2015;41:41.
  6. Jinabhai A, et al. Optical quality and visual performance with customised soft contact lenses for keratoconus. Opthalmic and Physiological Optics. 2014;34:528.
  7. Amayem AF, et al. Refractive and visual outcomes of penetrating keratoplasty versus deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty with hydrodissection for treatment of keratoconus. Cornea. 2013;32:e2.
  8. Keratoconus diagnosis. American Academy of Ophthalmology. Accessed Nov. 24, 2015.
  9. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 27, 2015.
  10. Keratoconus. American Optometric Association. Accessed Dec. 23, 2015.
  11. Keratoconus. Merck Professional Version. Accessed Dec. 23, 2015.
  12. Yanoff M, ed., et al. Testing of refraction. In: Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Edinburgh, U.K.: Mosby Elsevier; 2014. Accessed Oct. 30, 2014.
  13. Yanoff M, ed., et al. Keratoconus and other ectasias. In: Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Edinburgh, U.K.: Mosby Elsevier; 2014. Accessed Oct. 30, 2014.
  14. Patel SV (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 5, 2016.