For a mild case of jock itch, your doctor may suggest first using an over-the-counter antifungal ointment, lotion, powder or spray. The rash may clear up quickly with these treatments, but continue applying the medication as directed for one to two weeks.

If you also have athlete's foot, treat it at the same time you are treating your jock itch. This will reduce the risk of recurrence. If jock itch is severe or doesn't respond to over-the-counter medicine, you may need prescription-strength creams or ointments — or even antifungal pills.

July 26, 2016
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