Intracranial venous malformations are abnormally enlarged veins in your brain. Venous malformations are a type of blood vessel abnormality in your brain or spinal cord (central nervous system vascular malformations).

  • Experience. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in brain and nervous system conditions (neurologists), brain and nervous system surgery (neurosurgeons), and other specialties have experience in diagnosing and treating intracranial venous malformations and other brain and blood vessel conditions (cerebrovascular conditions).
  • Team approach. Mayo Clinic neurologists, neurosurgeons, doctors trained in brain imaging (neuroradiologists) and other doctors work together to diagnose and treat your condition.
  • Research. Mayo Clinic doctors study intracranial venous malformations and related conditions and conduct clinical trials.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked high performing for neurology and neurosurgery by U.S. News & World Report.

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Doctors trained in neurology, neurosurgery and neuroradiology treat intracranial venous malformations at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

For appointments or more information, call the Central Appointment Office at 800-446-2279 (toll-free) 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mountain Standard Time, Monday through Friday or complete an online appointment request form.

Doctors trained in neurology, neurosurgery and neuroradiology treat intracranial venous malformations at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

For appointments or more information, call the Central Appointment Office at 904-953-0853 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday or complete an online appointment request form.

Doctors trained in neurology, neurosurgery and neuroradiology treat intracranial venous malformations at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota.

For appointments or more information, call the Central Appointment Office at 507-538-3270 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Central time, Monday through Friday or complete an online appointment request form.

See information on patient services at the three Mayo Clinic locations, including transportation options and lodging.

Mayo Clinic doctors trained in brain and nervous system conditions (neurology), brain imaging (neuroradiology), and other areas diagnose your condition.

Your doctor may diagnose intracranial venous malformations during testing for other neurological conditions. You often don't experience symptoms.

Your doctor may order imaging tests to diagnose intracranial venous malformations or other neurological conditions.

  • Computerized tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan creates a series of X-rays to create detailed, cross-sectional images of your blood vessels and your brain. Sometimes a doctor may inject a dye into a vein to view the blood vessels in greater detail (CT angiogram or CT venogram).
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this test, magnetic and radio waves create detailed 3-D images of your blood vessels and your brain. Sometimes a doctor may inject a contrast dye into your blood vessels to make your blood vessels visible on the images (magnetic resonance angiography or magnetic resonance venography).

Read more about CT scan and MRI.

Doctors trained in brain and nervous system conditions (neurology), brain and nervous system surgery (neurosurgery), brain imaging (neuroradiology), and other areas work together to appropriately manage intracranial venous malformations and other neurological conditions.

Doctors usually don't treat intracranial venous malformations, because they rarely cause any symptoms. If you do experience symptoms, such as headaches, your doctor may give you medications.

People who have intracranial venous malformations rarely may experience seizures or bleeding in the brain (brain hemorrhage), which usually is caused by a cavernous malformation, or other vascular malformation that can be found in association with a venous malformation. Your doctor typically treats seizures with medications. Some hemorrhages may require surgery, but many hemorrhages may be treated with medical management and close observation, at least initially in the hospital setting.

Mayo Clinic doctors trained in brain and nervous system conditions (neurologists) and other specialties study clinical and laboratory research related to intracranial venous malformations and other neurological conditions. Learn more on the neurology research website.

Mayo publications

See a list of publications by Mayo doctors on intracranial venous malformations and other vascular malformations at PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Nov. 20, 2012