Preparing for your appointment

Intestinal obstruction is usually a medical emergency. As a result, you may not have much time to prepare for an appointment. If you have time before your appointment, make a list of your signs and symptoms so that you can better answer your doctor's questions.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, including:

  • When did you begin experiencing abdominal pain or other symptoms?
  • Did your symptoms come on all of a sudden or have you had symptoms like these before?
  • Is your pain continuous?
  • Have you experienced nausea, vomiting, fever, blood in your stool, diarrhea or constipation?
  • Have you had surgery or radiation in your abdomen?
Dec. 31, 2015
References
  1. Feldman M, et al. Intestinal obstruction. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 10, 2015.
  2. Glancy DG. Intestinal obstruction. Surgery. 2014;34:204.
  3. Kitagawa S, et al. Intussusception in children. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 10, 2015.
  4. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/digestive-diseases/intestinal-pseudo-obstruction/Pages/facts.aspx. Accessed Sept. 17, 2015.
  5. Ileus. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/gastrointestinal-disorders/acute-abdomen-and-surgical-gastroenterology/ileus. Accessed Sept. 18, 2015.