Research

Mayo Clinic has made important contributions to the treatment of IBD over the years, including pioneering the ileal pouch anal anastomosis surgery and laparoscopic surgery for ulcerative colitis. A Mayo Clinic researcher discovered that genetic differences significantly affected the way patients metabolized a widely used IBD drug, azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine. Mayo Clinic researchers conducted the first clinical study of Asacol and have shown that nicotine is an effective therapy for ulcerative colitis.

Mayo Clinic's inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) serum and tissue biobank involves all Mayo Clinic campuses. Research into serologic and genetic markers may lead to individualized diagnosis and treatment.

Researchers in the Enteric Neuroscience Program (ENSP) on each of the Mayo Clinic campuses investigate the biology of the neuromuscular system of the gastrointestinal tract. They are conducting numerous clinical trials related to IBD and other conditions.

Publications

See a list of publications on inflammatory bowel disease by Mayo Clinic doctors on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Aug. 09, 2017
References
  1. Goldman L, et al., eds. Inflammatory bowel disease. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 10, 2017.
  2. What is inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/ibd/what-is-IBD.htm. Accessed July 7, 2017.
  3. Overview of inflammatory bowel disease. The Merck Manual for Health Care Professionals. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/gastrointestinal-disorders/inflammatory-bowel-disease-ibd/overview-of-inflammatory-bowel-disease. Accessed July 7, 2017.
  4. IBD overview. American College of Gastroenterology. http://patients.gi.org/topics/inflammatory-bowel-disease/#tabs2. Accessed July 7, 2017.
  5. IBD 101: What is inflammatory bowel disease? American Gastroenterological Association. http://www.gastro.org/info_for_patients/ibd-101-what-is-inflammatory-bowel-disease. Accessed July 7, 2017.
  6. Peppercorn MA, et al. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and prognosis of ulcerative colitis in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed July 7, 2017.
  7. What is colorectal cancer screening? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/basic_info/screening/. Accessed May 12, 2017.
  8. Feldman M, et al. Ulcerative colitis. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 20, 2017.
  9. Inflammatory bowel disease. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/inflammatory-bowel-disease. Accessed July 7, 2017.
  10. The role of endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 2015;81:1101.
  11. Ulcerative colitis. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/ulcerative-colitis. Accessed June 20, 2017.
  12. Diet, nutrition, and inflammatory bowel disease. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. http://www.crohnscolitisfoundation.org/. Accessed May 15, 2017.
  13. Inflammatory bowel disease. Natural Medicines. https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com. Accessed June 21, 2017.
  14. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Crohn's & Colitis Foundation. http://www.crohnscolitisfoundation.org/resources/complementary-alternative.html. Accessed June 21, 2017.
  15. Yanai H, et al. Complementary therapies in inflammatory bowel diseases. Current Gastroenterology Reports. 2016;18:62.
  16. Brown A. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 17, 2017.
  17. Rajan E (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 14, 2017.