Preparing for your appointment

If reflux continues after your child's first birthday, or if your child is having symptoms such as lack of weight gain and breathing problems, you might be referred to a doctor who specializes in children's digestive diseases (pediatric gastroenterologist).

What you can do

  • Write down your baby's symptoms, including how frequently your baby spits up and the amount of liquid that is spit up.
  • Write down key medical information, including how often you feed your baby, how long the feedings last and the brand of any formula that you are using.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.

Questions to ask your doctor

  • What's the most likely cause of my baby's symptoms?
  • Does my baby need any tests?
  • What treatments are available?
  • Should I make any changes in how or what I feed my baby?

In addition to the questions that you've prepared to ask your doctor, don't hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may leave time to go over points you want to spend more time on. You may be asked:

  • When did your baby first begin experiencing symptoms?
  • Does your baby spit up with every feeding or only occasionally?
  • Is your baby content between feedings?
  • Have you recently switching from breast-feeding to bottle-feeding? Or have you switched infant formulas?
  • How often do you feed your baby, and how much does your baby eat at each feeding?
  • If you have different caregivers, does everyone feed the baby the same way each time?
  • Does anything seem to improve or worsen your baby's symptoms?
Nov. 18, 2015
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  2. Martin RJ, et al., eds. Gastroesophageal reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease in the neonate. In: Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. Accessed Sept. 17, 2015.
  3. Randel A. AAP releases guideline for the management of gastroesophageal reflux in children. American Family Physician. 2014;89:395.
  4. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infants. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Accessed Sept. 19, 2015.
  5. AskMayoExpert. Gastroesophageal reflux disease. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  6. Batra A, et al. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in infancy. Pediatrics and Child Health. 2015;25:406.
  7. Onyeador N, et al. Paedeatric gastroesophageal reflux clinical practice guidelines. Archives of Disease in Childhood — Education and Practice. 2014;99:190.