Self-management

Lifestyle and home remedies

Mild indigestion can often be helped with lifestyle changes, including:

  • Eating smaller, more-frequent meals. Chew your food slowly and thoroughly.
  • Avoiding triggers. Fatty and spicy foods, processed foods, carbonated beverages, caffeine, alcohol, and smoking can trigger indigestion.
  • Maintaining a healthy weight. Excess pounds put pressure on your abdomen, pushing up your stomach and causing acid to back up into your esophagus.
  • Exercising regularly. Exercise helps you keep off extra weight and promotes better digestion.
  • Managing stress. Create a calm environment at mealtime. Practice relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, meditation or yoga. Spend time doing things you enjoy. Get plenty of sleep.
  • Changing your medications. With your doctor's approval, stop or cut back on pain relievers or other medications that may irritate your stomach lining. If that's not an option, be sure to take these medications with food.
Aug. 24, 2016
References
  1. Feldman M, et al. Dyspepsia. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 6, 2016.
  2. Talley MJ, et al. Functional Dyspepsia. New England Journal of Medicine. 2015;373:1852.
  3. Indigestion. National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/indigestion/index.aspx. Accessed Jan. 28, 2016.
  4. Papadakis MA, et al., eds. Gastrointestinal disorders. In: Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment 2015. 54th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2015. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Jan. 28, 2016.
  5. Dyspepsia. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/print/gastrointestinal_disorders/approach_to_the_patient_with_upper_gi_complaints/dyspepsia.html. Accessed Jan. 28, 2016.
  6. Overland MK. Dyspepsia. Medical Clinics of North America. 2014;98:549.
  7. Ottillinger B, et al. STW 5 (Iberogast) — A safe and effective standard in the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift. 2013;163:65.
  8. Aucoin M, et al. Mindfulness-based therapies in the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders: A meta-analysis. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2014;2014:1.
  9. Kim KN, et al. Efficacy of acupuncture treatment for functional dyspepsia: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Complementary Therapies in Medicine. 2015;23:759.