Mayo Clinic researchers are conducting clinical trials of new diagnostic tools for particular types of indigestion. Researchers at Mayo Clinic are also working to develop improved treatments for functional dyspepsia.

Researchers in the Enteric Neuroscience Program are studying the underlying mechanics of the digestive system, including nerve reflexes between the stomach and brain. Other areas of research include use of novel medications to reduce stomach sensitivity and the genetics of dyspepsia.


See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic doctors on dyspepsia on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Aug. 24, 2016
  1. Feldman M, et al. Dyspepsia. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. Accessed Jan. 6, 2016.
  2. Talley MJ, et al. Functional Dyspepsia. New England Journal of Medicine. 2015;373:1852.
  3. Indigestion. National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse. Accessed Jan. 28, 2016.
  4. Papadakis MA, et al., eds. Gastrointestinal disorders. In: Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment 2015. 54th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2015. Accessed Jan. 28, 2016.
  5. Dyspepsia. Merck Manual Professional Version. Accessed Jan. 28, 2016.
  6. Overland MK. Dyspepsia. Medical Clinics of North America. 2014;98:549.
  7. Ottillinger B, et al. STW 5 (Iberogast) — A safe and effective standard in the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift. 2013;163:65.
  8. Aucoin M, et al. Mindfulness-based therapies in the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders: A meta-analysis. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2014;2014:1.
  9. Kim KN, et al. Efficacy of acupuncture treatment for functional dyspepsia: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Complementary Therapies in Medicine. 2015;23:759.