People with mild idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura may need nothing more than regular monitoring and platelet checks. Children usually improve without treatment. Most adults with ITP will eventually need treatment, as the condition often becomes severe or long-term (chronic) ITP.

Treatment may include a number of approaches, such as medications to boost your platelet count or surgery to remove your spleen (splenectomy). Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of your treatment options. Some people find that the side effects of treatment are more burdensome than the effects of the disease itself.


Your doctor will talk with you about medications or supplements you take and whether you need to stop using any that might inhibit platelet function. Examples include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others), ginkgo biloba and warfarin (Coumadin).

Your doctor may prescribe one or more of the following medications to treat ITP:

  • Drugs that suppress your immune system. Your doctor will likely start you on an oral corticosteroid, such as prednisone. This drug may help raise your platelet count by decreasing the activity of your immune system. Once your platelet count is back to a safe level, you can gradually discontinue taking the drug under the direction of your doctor. In general, this takes about two to six weeks.

    The problem is that many adults experience a relapse after discontinuing corticosteroids. A new course of corticosteroids may be pursued, but long-term use of these medications isn't recommended because of the risk of serious side effects. These include cataracts, high blood sugar, increased risk of infections and thinning of bones (osteoporosis).

  • Injections to increase your blood count. If corticosteroids don't help, your doctor may give you an injection of immune globulin (IVIG). This drug may also be used if you have critical bleeding or need to quickly increase your blood count before surgery. The effect usually wears off in a couple of weeks. Possible side effects include headache, vomiting and low blood pressure.
  • Drugs that boost platelet production. Thrombopoietin receptor agonists — such as romiplostim (Nplate) and eltrombopag (Promacta) — help your bone marrow produce more platelets. Possible side effects include headache, dizziness, nausea or vomiting, and an increased risk of blood clots.
  • Other immune-suppressing drugs. Rituximab (Rituxan) helps reduce the immune system response that's damaging platelets, thus raising the platelet count. Possible side effects include low blood pressure, fever, sore throat and rash.

Emergency treatment

Although rare, severe bleeding can occur with ITP. Emergency care usually includes transfusions of platelet concentrates, intravenous corticosteroid (methylprednisolone) and intravenous immune globulin.

Treatments for resistant disease

If your condition persists despite treatment, your doctor may suggest other drugs that suppress the immune system or boost platelet production:

  • Removal of your spleen. If your condition is severe or persists despite initial drug treatment, your doctor may suggest surgical removal of your spleen (splenectomy). This quickly eliminates the main source of platelet destruction in your body and improves your platelet count, though it doesn't work for everyone. Serious post-surgical complications sometimes occur, and not having a spleen permanently increases your susceptibility to infection.

    Splenectomy is rarely a treatment choice for children with ITP because they often get better without treatment.

  • Other drugs. Azathioprine (Imuran, Azasan) has been used to treat ITP. But it can cause significant side effects, and its effectiveness has yet to be proved. Possible side effects include fever, headache, nausea and vomiting, and muscle pain.
April 23, 2016
  1. AskMayoExpert. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  2. AskMayoExpert. Spleen disorders and splenectomy. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  3. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Merck Manual Professional Version. Accessed Feb. 10, 2016.
  4. Yeo CJ, et al., eds. Splenectomy for conditions other than trauma. In: Shackelford's Surgery of the Alimentary Tract. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2013.
  5. Immune thrombocytopenic? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Accessed Feb. 9, 2016.
  6. George JN, et al. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adults: Clinical manifestations and diagnosis. Accessed Feb. 10, 2016.
  7. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Feb. 11, 2016.
  8. Neunert C, et al. The American Society of Hematology 2011 evidence-based guidelines for immune thrombocytopenia. Blood. 2011;117:4190.
  9. CBC with differential, blood. Mayo Medical Laboratories. Accessed Feb. 12, 2016.
  10. George JN, et al. Approach to the adult with unexplained thrombocytopenia. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  11. George JN, et al. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adults: Initial treatment and prognosis. Accessed Feb. 10, 2016.
  12. George JN, et al. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adults: Second-line and subsequent therapies. Accessed Feb. 10, 2016.
  13. Leandro MJ. Rituximab and other B cell targeted therapies for rheumatoid arthritis. Accessed Feb. 16, 2016.
  14. Imuran (azathioprine). U.S. Food and Drug Administration.,017391s016lbl.pdf. Accessed Feb. 16, 2016.
  15. Arnold DM. Positioning new treatments in the management of immune thrombocytopenia. Pediatric Blood & Cancer. 2013;60:S19.
  16. Mesa RA (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz. Feb. 17, 2016.