Treatment

Some forms of hypospadias are very minor and do not require surgery. However, treatment usually involves surgery to reposition the urethral opening and, if necessary, straighten the shaft of the penis. Surgery is usually done between the ages of 6 and 12 months.

If the penis looks abnormal, circumcision should not be done. If hypospadias is found during circumcision, the procedure should be completed. In either case, referral to a pediatric urologist is recommended.

Surgery

Most forms of hypospadias can be corrected in a single surgery that's done on an outpatient basis. Some forms of hypospadias will require more than one surgery to correct the defect.

When the urethral opening is near the base of the penis, the surgeon may need to use tissue grafts from the foreskin or from the inside of the mouth to reconstruct the urinary channel in the proper position, correcting the hypospadias.

Results of surgery

In most cases, surgery is highly successful. Most of the time the penis looks normal after surgery, and boys have normal urination and reproduction.

Occasionally, a hole (fistula) develops along the underside of the penis where the new urinary channel was created and results in urine leakage. Rarely, there is a problem with wound healing or scarring. These complications may require an additional surgery for repair.

Follow-up care

Your child will need a couple of visits to the surgeon after surgery. After that, regular follow-up with your child's pediatric urologist is recommended after toilet training and at puberty to check for healing and possible complications.