Preparing for your appointment

You'll likely start by seeing your primary care provider. You might then be referred to a doctor who specializes in treating hormone disorders (endocrinologist).

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

When you make the appointment, ask if there's anything you need to do in advance, such as fasting for a specific test. Make a list of:

  • Your symptoms, including those that seem unrelated to the reason for which you scheduled the appointment, and when they began
  • Key personal information, including major stresses or recent life changes and your and your family's medical history
  • All medications, vitamins and other supplements you take, including doses
  • Questions to ask your doctor

Take a family member or friend with you, if possible, to help you remember the information you're given.

For hypoparathyroidism, questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What is likely causing my symptoms?
  • What are other possible causes?
  • What tests do I need?
  • Is my condition likely temporary or chronic?
  • What treatments are available, and which do you recommend?
  • What are the alternatives to the primary approach you're suggesting?
  • How can I best manage this condition with my other health conditions?
  • Do I need to change my diet?
  • Are there brochures or other printed material I can take? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask other questions.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you questions, including:

  • Have you recently had surgery involving your neck?
  • Have you received radiation therapy to your head or neck or for treatment of thyroid problems?
  • Has anyone in your family had similar symptoms?
  • Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  • How severe are your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, seems to improve your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?
May 05, 2017
References
  1. Hypoparathyroidism. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development. http://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/hypopara/Pages/default.aspx. Accessed Dec. 27, 2016.
  2. Goltzman D. Hypoparathyroidism. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 27, 2016
  3. Hypoparathyroidism. The Hormone Health Network. http://www.hormone.org/questions-and-answers/2013/hypoparathyroidism. Accessed Dec. 27, 2016.
  4. Bollerslev J, et al. European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Guideline: Treatment of chronic hypoparathyroidism in adults. European Journal of Endocrinology. 2015;173:G1.
  5. Clarke BL, et al. Epidemiology and diagnosis of hypoparathyroidism. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2016;101:2284.
  6. FDA approves Natpara to control low blood calcium levels in patients with hypoparathyroidism. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm431358.htm. Accessed Jan. 2, 2017.
  7. Nippoldt TB (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Accessed Jan. 2, 2017.