Why choose Mayo Clinic

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Appointments

Mayo Clinic accepts appointments in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota and at Mayo Clinic Health System sites.

Request an Appointment
  • Experience. Mayo Clinic is one of the most experienced medical centers in the world in caring for people who have genetic (primary) and intestinal forms of hyperoxaluria.
  • Special expertise and team approach. The Mayo Clinic Hyperoxaluria Center in Minnesota brings together doctors from many specialties to design a personalized treatment plan, based on the type and severity of hyperoxaluria and any related conditions. Mayo Clinic offers a range of services, from treatment to reduce oxalate in your urine, to minimally invasive procedures for kidney stone treatment and removal. Or, if needed for severe hyperoxaluria, Mayo's highly skilled surgeons can perform kidney or kidney-liver transplants.
  • Specialized testing. Mayo Clinic's laboratory has special capability to run specific tests for hyperoxaluria, such as measurement of oxalate in blood and urine and DNA testing, that aren't widely available.
  • Efficient care. Mayo Clinic coordinates your testing and doctor appointments to speed the process of diagnosis and treatment. A specialist in kidney diseases (nephrologist) usually manages your care.
  • Research. The Mayo Clinic Hyperoxaluria Center in Minnesota conducts research to understand the disease and find more effective treatments. When appropriate, you have the opportunity to participate in the Rare Kidney Stone Consortium primary hyperoxaluria registry and in clinical trials to test new diagnosis and treatment options.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for kidney disorders in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked high performing for kidney disorders by U.S. News & World Report.

About

There are several types of hyperoxaluria:

  • Primary hyperoxaluria. Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare inherited (genetic) condition present at birth. In this type, the liver doesn't create enough of a certain protein (enzyme) that prevents overproduction of oxalate, or the enzyme doesn't work properly. Excess oxalate is eliminated through your kidneys, in your urine. The extra oxalate can combine with calcium to create kidney stones and crystals, which can damage the kidneys and cause them to stop working (renal failure).

    Kidney stones form early and most often cause symptoms during childhood or adolescence. Because of the very large amounts of oxalate produced, most people's kidneys fail by early to middle adulthood, but renal failure can occur as early as infancy. To date, experts have identified three different genetic causes of primary hyperoxaluria.

  • Oxalosis. Oxalosis occurs if you have primary hyperoxaluria and your kidneys fail. Because your body can no longer eliminate the extra oxalate, it starts accumulating — first in your blood, then in your eyes, bones, skin, muscles, blood vessels, heart and other organs. This can cause multiple problems.
  • Enteric hyperoxaluria. Several intestinal diseases, including Crohn's disease and short bowel syndrome as a result of surgical procedures, increase the absorption of oxalate from foods, which can then increase the amount of oxalate excreted in the urine.
  • Hyperoxaluria related to consuming high-oxalate foods. Eating large amounts of foods high in oxalate can increase your risk of hyperoxaluria or kidney stones. Ask your doctor or dietitian for a list of high-oxalate foods. Avoiding high-oxalate foods is particularly important if you have enteric hyperoxaluria.

Resources

Below are some helpful Internet resources on this topic. Mayo Clinic does not own or control any of these sites and is not responsible for their content. Inclusion of these sites does not imply endorsement by Mayo Clinic.

Oxalosis & Hyperoxaluria Foundation

Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network

Rare Kidney Stone Consortium

Apr. 01, 2013