Preparing for your appointment

You might start by seeing your primary care provider. However, you'll probably be referred to a doctor who specializes in treating hormonal disorders (endocrinologist).

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Before your appointment, make a list of:

  • Your symptoms, including those that seem unrelated, and when they began
  • Key personal information, including major stresses or recent life changes, medical history and family medical history
  • All medications, vitamins and other supplements you take, including doses
  • Questions to ask your doctor

Take a family member or friend along, if possible, to help you remember the information you're given.

For hypercalcemia, basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • What tests do I need?
  • What treatments are available, and which do you recommend?
  • What side effects can I expect from treatment?
  • Are there alternatives to the primary approach that you're suggesting?
  • I have other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you questions, including:

  • Does anything improve your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, worsens your symptoms?
  • Have you had kidney stones, bone fractures or osteoporosis?
  • Do you have bone pain?
  • Do you have unexplained weight loss?
  • Have family members had hypercalcemia or kidney stones?
July 07, 2017
References
  1. Shane E. Clinical manifestations of hypercalcemia. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 27, 2016.
  2. AskMayoExpert. Hypercalcemia. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  3. Fact sheet: High blood calcium (hypercalcemia). Hormone Health Network. http://www.hormone.org/questions-and-answers/2012/hypercalcemia. Accessed Dec. 27, 2016.
  4. Shane E, et al. Treatment of hypercalcemia. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 28, 2016.
  5. Primary hyperparathyroidism. National Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Information Service. http://endocrine.niddk.nih.gov/pubs/hyper. Accessed Dec. 28, 2016.
  6. Hypercalcemia. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/endocrine-and-metabolic-disorders/electrolyte-disorders/hypercalcemia. Accessed Dec. 27, 2016.