Usually, the only indication of a hydrocele is a painless swelling of one or both testicles.

Adult men with a hydrocele might experience discomfort from the heaviness of a swollen scrotum. Pain generally increases with the size of the inflammation. Sometimes, the swollen area might be smaller in the morning and larger later in the day.

When to see a doctor

See your doctor if you or your child experiences scrotal swelling. It's important to rule out other causes of the swelling that might require treatment. For example, a hydrocele might be associated with a weak point in the abdominal wall that allows a loop of intestine to extend into the scrotum (inguinal hernia).

A baby's hydrocele typically disappears on its own. However, if your baby's hydrocele doesn't disappear after a year or if it enlarges, you should ask your child's doctor to examine the hydrocele again.

Get immediate medical treatment if you or your child develops sudden, severe scrotal pain or swelling, especially within several hours of an injury to the scrotum. These signs and symptoms can occur with a number of conditions, including blocked blood flow in a twisted testicle (testicular torsion). Testicular torsion must be treated within hours of the beginning of symptoms to save the testicle.

Oct. 09, 2014

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