Diagnosis

Your doctor will examine your welts or areas of swelling if they are still present and take a careful medical history to identify possible causes. In some cases, he or she may recommend an allergy skin test. He or she may order blood tests to check for levels and function of specific blood proteins if hereditary angioedema is a possible diagnosis.

Nov. 09, 2016
References
  1. Habif TP. Urticaria, angioedema, and pruritus. In: Clinical Dermatology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 10, 2016.
  2. Hives (urticaria). American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. http://acaai.org/allergies/types/skin-allergies/hives-urticaria. Accessed Sept. 10, 2016.
  3. Ferri FF. Urticaria. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 10, 2016.
  4. Bingham CO. New onset urticaria. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 10, 2016.
  5. Zuraw B, et al. An overview of angioedema: Clinical features, diagnosis, and management. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 10, 2016.