Most growth plate fractures heal with no complications. But the following factors can increase the risk of crooked or stunted bone growth.

  • Severity of the injury. If the growth plate has been shifted, shattered or crushed, the risk of limb deformity is greater.
  • Age of the child. Younger children have more years of growth ahead of them, so if the growth plate is permanently damaged, there is more chance of deformity developing. If a child is almost done growing, permanent damage to the growth plate may cause only minimal deformity.
  • Location of the injury. The growth plates around the knee are more sensitive to injury. A growth plate fracture at the knee can cause the leg to be short or crooked if the growth plate has permanent damage. Growth plate injuries around the wrist and shoulder usually heal without problems.
Jun. 29, 2013

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