Treatment

Depending on the severity of the greenstick fracture, the doctor may need to straighten the bone manually so it will heal properly. Your child will receive pain medication and possibly sedation drugs for this procedure.

Greenstick fractures have a high risk of breaking completely through the bone, so most of these types of fractures are immobilized in a cast during healing.

On occasion, your doctor may decide that a removable splint could work just as well, particularly if the break is mostly healed. The benefit of a splint is that your child might be able to take it off briefly for a bath or shower.

X-rays are required in a few weeks to make sure the fracture is healing properly, to check the alignment of the bone, and to determine when a cast is no longer needed. Most greenstick fractures require four to eight weeks for complete healing, depending on the break and the age of the child.

April 28, 2016
References
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  2. Kliegman RM, et al. Common fractures. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  3. Schweich P. Distal forearm fractures in children: Diagnosis and assessment. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  4. Mencio GA. Fractures and dislocations of the forearm, wrist and hand. In: Green's Skeletal Trauma in Children. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  5. Mathison DJ, et al. General principles of fracture management: Fracture patterns and description in children. http://www.uptodate.com/home. March 21, 2016.
  6. Schweich P. Distal forearm fractures in children: Initial management. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  7. Schweich P. Closed reduction and casting of distal forearm fractures in children. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  8. Herring JA. Upper extremity injuries. In: Tachdjian's Pediatric Orthopedics. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 21, 2016.