Diagnosis

During the physical exam, your doctor will inspect the affected area for tenderness, swelling, deformity, numbness or an open wound. Your child may be asked to move his or her fingers into certain patterns or motions to check for nerve damage. Your doctor may also examine the joints above and below the fracture.

X-rays can reveal most greenstick fractures. Your doctor may want to take X-rays of the uninjured limb, for comparison purposes.

April 28, 2016
References
  1. Marx JA, et al., eds. General principles of orthopedic injuries. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  2. Kliegman RM, et al. Common fractures. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  3. Schweich P. Distal forearm fractures in children: Diagnosis and assessment. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  4. Mencio GA. Fractures and dislocations of the forearm, wrist and hand. In: Green's Skeletal Trauma in Children. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  5. Mathison DJ, et al. General principles of fracture management: Fracture patterns and description in children. http://www.uptodate.com/home. March 21, 2016.
  6. Schweich P. Distal forearm fractures in children: Initial management. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  7. Schweich P. Closed reduction and casting of distal forearm fractures in children. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  8. Herring JA. Upper extremity injuries. In: Tachdjian's Pediatric Orthopedics. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 21, 2016.