Treatment

Gonorrhea treatment in adults

Adults with gonorrhea are treated with antibiotics. Due to emerging strains of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that uncomplicated gonorrhea be treated only with the antibiotic ceftriaxone — given as an injection — in combination with either azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax) or doxycycline (Monodox, Vibramycin, others) — two antibiotics that are taken orally.

Some research indicates that oral gemifloxacin (Factive) or injectable gentamicin, combined with oral azithromycin, is highly successful in treating gonorrhea. This treatment may be helpful in treating people who are allergic to cephalosporin antibiotics, such as ceftriaxone.

Gonorrhea treatment for partners

Your partner also should undergo testing and treatment for gonorrhea, even if he or she has no signs or symptoms. Your partner receives the same treatment you do. Even if you've been treated for gonorrhea, you can be reinfected if your partner isn't treated.

Gonorrhea treatment for babies

Babies born to mothers with gonorrhea receive a medication in their eyes soon after birth to prevent infection. If an eye infection develops, babies can be treated with antibiotics.

Oct. 25, 2016
References
  1. WHO guidelines for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/rtis/gonorrhoea-treatment-guidelines/en/. Accessed Sept. 18, 2016.
  2. Morgan MK, et al. Gonorrhea. Disease-a-Month. 2016;62:260.
  3. Skerlev M, et al. Gonorrhea: New challenges. Clinics in Dermatology. 2014;32:275.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, et al. Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines. MMWR. 2015;64:1. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6403a1.htm. Accessed Sept. 18, 2016.
  5. Gonorrhea: CDC fact sheet (detailed version). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/std/gonorrhea/stdfact-gonorrhea-detailed.htm. Accessed Sept. 18, 2016.
  6. Fajardo-Bernal L, et al. Home-based versus clinic-based specimen collection in the management of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD011317.pub2/full. Accessed Sept. 20, 2016.
  7. Ferri FF. Gonorrhea. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 18, 2016.