Treatment

Prompt treatment usually reverses symptoms of gingivitis and prevents its progression to more serious gum disease and tooth loss. You have the best chance for successful treatment when you also adopt a daily routine of good oral care and stop tobacco use.

Professional gingivitis care includes:

  • Professional dental cleaning. Your initial professional cleaning will include removing all traces of plaque, tartar and bacterial products — a procedure known as scaling and root planing. Scaling removes tartar and bacteria from your tooth surfaces and beneath your gums. Root planning removes the bacterial products produced by inflammation, smooths the root surfaces, discouraging further buildup of tartar and bacteria, and allows proper healing. The procedure may be performed using instruments, a laser or an ultrasonic device.
  • Dental restoration, if needed. Misaligned teeth or poorly fitting crowns, bridges or other dental restorations may irritate your gums and make it harder to remove plaque during daily oral care. If problems with your teeth or dental restorations contribute to your gingivitis, your dentist may recommend fixing these problems.
  • Ongoing care. Gingivitis usually clears up after a thorough professional cleaning — as long as you continue good oral hygiene at home. Your dentist will help you plan an effective at-home program and a schedule of regular professional checkups and cleaning.

If you're consistent with your home oral hygiene, you should see the return of pink, healthy gum tissue within days or weeks.

Feb. 03, 2017
References
  1. Wilder RS, et al. Gingivitis and periodontitis in adults: Classification and dental treatment. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 11, 2016.
  2. Periodontal (gum) disease: Causes, symptoms, and treatments. National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/oralhealth/Topics/GumDiseases/PeriodontalGumDisease.htm#. Accessed Nov. 10, 2016.
  3. Gum disease information. American Academy of Periodontology. https://www.perio.org/consumer/gum-disease.htm. Accessed Nov. 10, 2016.
  4. Gum disease. American Dental Association. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/g/gum-disease. Accessed Nov. 11, 2016.
  5. Brushing your teeth. American Dental Association. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/b/brushing-your-teeth. Accessed Nov. 15, 2016.
  6. Gingival inflammation without loss of periodontal attachment (gingivitis). American Dental Association. http://www.ada.org/en/science-research/dental-practice-parameters/gingival-inflammation-without-loss-of-periodontal-attachment. Accessed Nov. 15, 2016.
  7. Gingivitis. American Dental Association. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/g/gingivitis. Accessed Nov. 15, 2016.
  8. Gingivitis. Merck Manual Professional Version. https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/dental-disorders/periodontal-disorders/gingivitis. Accessed Nov. 15, 2016.
  9. Salinas TJ (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Nov. 19, 2016.