Preparing for your appointment

If you think you have genital herpes or other sexually transmitted infection, make an appointment to see your primary care doctor or gynecologist.

What you can do

Before your appointment, you might want to list answers to the following questions:

  • What are your symptoms? When did they start?
  • Do you have a new sexual partner or multiple partners?
  • Have you ever been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection?
  • Do you regularly use condoms?
  • What medications or supplements do you take regularly?

Some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What tests do I need?
  • Should I be tested for other sexually transmitted infections?
  • Should my partner be tested?
  • Do I need to abstain from sexual activity during treatment?
  • How can I avoid infecting my partner?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • Do you have pelvic pain?
  • Do you have pain while urinating?
  • Do you have sores or unusual discharge?
May 17, 2017
References
  1. Genital herpes: CDC detailed fact sheet. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/std/herpes/stdfact-herpes-detailed.htm. Accessed Jan. 19, 2017.
  2. Klausner JD, et al., eds. Genital herpes. In: Current Diagnosis & Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Diseases. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2007. http://accessmedicine.com. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  3. Albrecht MA. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations and diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  4. Longo DL, et al., eds. Herpes simplex virus infections. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 19th ed. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education; 2015. http://accessmedicine.com. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  5. Frequently asked questions. Gynecologic problems FAQ054. Genital herpes. American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/Patients/FAQs/Genital-Herpes. Accessed Jan. 19, 2017.