Overview

Fuchs' dystrophy causes the clear layer (cornea) on the front of your eye to swell. The disorder can lead to glare, cloudy vision and eye discomfort.

Fuchs' dystrophy usually affects both eyes and can cause your vision to gradually worsen over years. But most people with Fuchs' dystrophy don't develop symptoms until they reach their 50s or 60s.

Some medications and self-care steps may help relieve your Fuchs' dystrophy signs and symptoms. But when the disorder is advanced and you've lost vision, the only way to restore vision is with cornea transplant surgery.

Fuchs' dystrophy care at Mayo Clinic

July 14, 2017
References
  1. Facts about the cornea and corneal disease. National Eye Institute. http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/cornealdisease. Accessed April 2, 2017.
  2. What is Fuchs' dystrophy? American Academy of Ophthalmology. https://www.aao.org/eye-health/diseases/what-is-fuchs-dystrophy. Accessed April 2, 2017.
  3. Vedana G, et al. Fuchs endothelial cornea dystrophy: Current perspectives. Clinical Ophthalmology. 2016;10:321.
  4. National Library of Medicine. Fuchs endothelial dystrophy. Genetics Home Reference. https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/fuchs-endothelial-dystrophy. Accessed April 2, 2017.
  5. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 2, 2017.