Diagnosis

Besides testing your vision, your doctor might also have you undergo the following tests to determine whether you have Fuchs' dystrophy:

  • Staging. Your doctor will try to determine the stage of your condition by examining your eye with an optical microscope (slit lamp). He or she will then study the cells lining the back of your cornea (endothelial cells). Irregular bumps (guttae) on the back of the cornea might indicate Fuchs' dystrophy.
  • Corneal pressure test. After numbing your eyes with drops, your doctor will briefly touch your eyes with a special instrument that measures eye pressure. This test can help distinguish between a disease that increases pressure in your eye (glaucoma) and Fuch's dystrophy.
  • Corneal thickness. Your doctor might use a special instrument to measure the thickness of the cornea.
  • Corneal cell count. Sometimes your doctor might use another special instrument to record the number, shape and size of the cells that line the back of the cornea.
July 14, 2017
References
  1. Facts about the cornea and corneal disease. National Eye Institute. http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/cornealdisease. Accessed April 2, 2017.
  2. What is Fuchs' dystrophy? American Academy of Ophthalmology. https://www.aao.org/eye-health/diseases/what-is-fuchs-dystrophy. Accessed April 2, 2017.
  3. Vedana G, et al. Fuchs endothelial cornea dystrophy: Current perspectives. Clinical Ophthalmology. 2016;10:321.
  4. National Library of Medicine. Fuchs endothelial dystrophy. Genetics Home Reference. https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/fuchs-endothelial-dystrophy. Accessed April 2, 2017.
  5. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 2, 2017.