Diagnosis

No single test can identify frontotemporal dementia, so doctors attempt to identify certain characteristic features while excluding other possible causes.

The disorder can be especially challenging to diagnose in the early stages, as symptoms of frontotemporal dementia often overlap with those of other conditions.

Blood tests

To see if your symptoms are being caused by a different condition, such as liver or kidney disease, your doctor may order blood tests.

Neuropsychological testing

Sometimes doctors undertake a more extensive assessment of reasoning and memory skills. This type of testing is especially helpful in determining the type of dementia at an early stage.

Brain scans

By looking at images of the brain, doctors may be able to pinpoint any visible abnormalities — such as clots, bleeding or tumors — that may be causing signs and symptoms.

  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An MRI machine uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field to produce detailed images of your brain.
  • Positron emission tomography (PET). PET scans use a small amount of low-dose radioactive material that's injected into a vein to help visualize blood sugar metabolism in the brain, which can help identify frontal or temporal lobe brain abnormalities.
Oct. 29, 2016
References
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