Self-management

Lifestyle and home remedies

You can try a number of things to make yourself or your child more comfortable during a fever:

  • Drink plenty of fluids. Fever can cause fluid loss and dehydration, so drink water, juices or broth. For a child under age 1, use an oral rehydration solution such as Pedialyte. These solutions contain water and salts proportioned to replenish fluids and electrolytes. Pedialyte ice pops also are available.
  • Rest. You need rest to recover, and activity can raise your body temperature.
  • Stay cool. Dress in light clothing, keep the room temperature cool and sleep with only a sheet or light blanket.

Prevention

You may be able to prevent fevers by reducing exposure to infectious diseases. Here are some tips that can help:

  • Wash your hands often and teach your children to do the same, especially before eating, after using the toilet, after spending time in a crowd or around someone who's sick, after petting animals, and during travel on public transportation.
  • Show your children how to wash their hands thoroughly, covering both the front and back of each hand with soap and rinsing completely under running water.
  • Carry hand sanitizer with you for times when you don't have access to soap and water.
  • Try to avoid touching your nose, mouth or eyes, as these are the main ways that viruses and bacteria can enter your body and cause infection.
  • Cover your mouth when you cough and your nose when you sneeze, and teach your children to do likewise. Whenever possible, turn away from others when coughing or sneezing to avoid passing germs along to them.
  • Avoid sharing cups, water bottles and utensils with your child or children.
July 21, 2017
References
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