Diagnosis

To evaluate a fever, your doctor may:

  • Ask questions about your symptoms and medical history
  • Perform a physical exam
  • Order tests, such as blood tests or a chest X-ray, as needed, based on your medical history and physical exam

Because a fever can indicate a serious illness in a young infant, especially one 28 days or younger, your baby might be admitted to the hospital for testing and treatment.

July 21, 2017
References
  1. Goldman L, et al., eds. Approach to fever or suspected infection in the normal host. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 5, 2017.
  2. Fever. Merck Manual Professional Version. https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/infectious-diseases/biology-of-infectious-disease/fever. Accessed April 5, 2017.
  3. Fever in infants and children. Merck Manual Professional Version. https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/pediatrics/symptoms-in-infants-and-children/fever-in-infants-and-children. Accessed April 5, 2017.
  4. Bennett JE, et al., eds. Temperature regulation and the pathogenesis of fever. In: Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 6, 2017.
  5. Kliegman RM, et al. Fever. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 6, 2017.
  6. Ward MA. Fever in infants and children: Pathophysiology and management. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 6, 2017.
  7. Schmitt BD. Fever. In: Pediatric Telephone Protocols: Office Version. 15th ed. Elk Grove Village, Ill.: American Academy of Pediatrics; 2015.
  8. Marx JA, et al., eds. Pediatric fever. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 9, 2017.
  9. How to take a child's temperature. American Academy of Pediatrics. https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/fever/Pages/How-to-Take-a-Childs-Temperature.aspx. Accessed May 11, 2017.
  10. Ward MA. Patient education: Fever in children (Beyond the basics). https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 11, 2017.
  11. AskMayoExpert. Infant fever (age 90 days or younger). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  12. Fever. Emergencies A-Z. American College of Emergency Physicians. http://www.emergencycareforyou.org/Emergency-101/Emergencies-A-Z/Fever. Accessed May 18, 2017.
  13. Marx JA, et al., eds. Fever in the adult patient. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 18, 2017.
  14. Bor DH. Approach to the adult with fever of unknown origin. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  15. Febrile seizures fact sheet. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Fact-Sheets/Febrile-Seizures-Fact-Sheet. Accessed May 31, 2017.
  16. When and how to wash your hands. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/when-how-handwashing.html. Accessed May 31, 2017.
  17. Cover your cough. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/covercough.htm. Accessed May 31, 2017.