Diagnosis

If you've been unable to conceive within a reasonable period of time, seek help from your doctor for evaluation and treatment of infertility.

Fertility tests may include:

  • Ovulation testing. An at-home, over-the-counter ovulation prediction kit detects the surge in luteinizing hormone (LH) that occurs before ovulation. A blood test for progesterone — a hormone produced after ovulation — can also document that you're ovulating. Other hormone levels, such as prolactin, also may be checked.
  • Hysterosalpingography. During hysterosalpingography (his-tur-o-sal-ping-GOG-ruh-fee), X-ray contrast is injected into your uterus and an X-ray is taken to detect abnormalities in the uterine cavity. The test also determines whether the fluid passes out of the uterus and spills out of your fallopian tubes. If abnormalities are found, you'll likely need further evaluation. In a few women, the test itself can improve fertility, possibly by flushing out and opening the fallopian tubes.
  • Ovarian reserve testing. This testing helps determine the quality and quantity of eggs available for ovulation. Women at risk of a depleted egg supply — including women older than 35 — may have this series of blood and imaging tests.
  • Other hormone testing. Other hormone tests check levels of ovulatory hormones as well as thyroid and pituitary hormones that control reproductive processes.
  • Imaging tests. A pelvic ultrasound looks for uterine or fallopian tube disease. Sometimes a hysterosonography (his-tur-o-suh-NOG-ruh-fee) is used to see details inside the uterus that can't be seen on a regular ultrasound.

Depending on your situation, rarely your testing may include:

  • Other imaging tests. Depending on your symptoms, your doctor may request a hysteroscopy to look for uterine or fallopian tube disease.
  • Laparoscopy. This minimally invasive surgery involves making a small incision beneath your navel and inserting a thin viewing device to examine your fallopian tubes, ovaries and uterus. A laparoscopy may identify endometriosis, scarring, blockages or irregularities of the fallopian tubes, and problems with the ovaries and uterus.
  • Genetic testing. Genetic testing helps determine whether there's a genetic defect causing infertility.
Nov. 24, 2016
References
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  2. Frequently asked questions. Gynecologic problems FAQ138. Evaluating infertility. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq136.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20130521T1027034009. Accessed May 10, 2016.
  3. Infertility: Frequently asked questions. National Women's Health Information Center. http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/infertility.pdf. Accessed May 10, 2016.
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