Self-management

Lifestyle and home remedies

Along with professional treatment, these tips may help people who have factitious disorder:

  • Stick to your treatment plan. Attend therapy appointments and take any medications as directed. If you feel an urge to harm yourself or cause yourself to become ill, talk honestly to your therapist or primary care doctor for better ways to cope with emotions.
  • Have a medical gatekeeper. Have one trusted primary doctor to manage your medical care, rather than visiting numerous doctors, specialists and surgeons.
  • Remember the risks. Remind yourself that you could face permanent injury or even death each time you hurt yourself or have a risky test or surgery needlessly.
  • Don't run. Resist urges to find a new doctor or to flee to a new town where medical professionals aren't aware of your background. Your therapist can help you overcome these powerful urges.
  • Connect with someone. Many people with factitious disorder lack friendships and other relationships. Try to find someone you're able to confide in, share enjoyable times with and offer your own support to.

Prevention

Because the cause of factitious disorder is unknown, there's currently no known way to prevent it. Early recognition and treatment of factitious disorder may help avoid unnecessary and potentially dangerous tests and treatment.

May 31, 2017
References
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  2. Factitious disorder imposed on self. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/psychiatric-disorders/somatic-symptom-and-related-disorders/factitious-disorder-imposed-on-self. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  3. Yates GP, et al. Factitious disorder: A systematic review of 455 cases in the professional literature. General Hospital Psychiatry. 2016;41:20.
  4. Irwin MR, et al. Factitious disorder imposed on self (Munchausen syndrome). http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 31, 2107.
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  8. Jones TW, et al. Factitious disorder-by-proxy simulating fetal growth restriction. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2015;125:732.
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