Self-management

Coping and support

After you receive a diagnosis of endometrial cancer, you may have many questions, fears and concerns. Every person finds his or her own way to cope with an endometrial cancer diagnosis. In time, you'll find what works for you. Until then, you might try to:

  • Find out enough about endometrial cancer to make decisions about your care. Find out enough about your cancer so that you feel comfortable about making treatment choices. Ask your doctor about the stage, your treatment options and their side effects. In addition to talking with your doctor, look for information in your local library and on the internet. Good sources of information include the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society.
  • Maintain a strong support system. Strong relationships may help you cope with treatment. Talk with close friends and family members about how you're feeling. Connect with other cancer survivors through support groups in your community or online. Ask your doctor about support groups in your area.
  • Stay involved in your usual activities when you can. When you're feeling up to it, try to stay involved in your usual activities.

Prevention

To reduce your risk of endometrial cancer, you may wish to:

  • Talk to your doctor about the risks of hormone therapy after menopause. If you're considering hormone replacement therapy to help control menopause symptoms, talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits. Unless you've undergone a hysterectomy, replacing estrogen alone after menopause may increase your risk of endometrial cancer. Taking a combination of estrogen and progestin can reduce this risk. Hormone therapy carries other risks, such as a possible increase in the risk of breast cancer, so weigh the benefits and risks with your doctor.
  • Consider taking birth control pills. Using oral contraceptives for at least one year may reduce endometrial cancer risk. The risk reduction is thought to last for several years after you stop taking oral contraceptives. Oral contraceptives have side effects, though, so discuss the benefits and risks with your doctor.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Obesity increases the risk of endometrial cancer, so work to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. If you need to lose weight, increase your physical activity and reduce the number of calories you eat each day.
  • Exercise most days of the week. Exercise may reduce your risk of endometrial cancer. Add physical activity into your daily routine. Try to exercise 30 minutes most days of the week. If you can exercise more, that's even better.
May 26, 2016
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Endometrial cancer. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  2. Niederhuber JE, et al., eds. Uterine cancer. In: Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 26, 2016.
  3. Lentz GM, et al. Neoplastic diseases of the uterus. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2012. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 26, 2016.
  4. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) Committee on Practice Bulletins — Obstetrics. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 149: Endometrial cancer. Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2015;125:1006.
  5. Uterine neoplasms. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed April 26, 2016.
  6. Palliative care. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed April 26, 2016.
  7. Fader AN, et al. Utilization of minimally invasive surgery in endometrial cancer care. Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2016;127:91.