Diagnosis

Ectropion can usually be diagnosed with a routine eye exam and physical. Your doctor may pull on your eyelids during the exam or ask you to close your eyes forcefully. This helps him or her assess your eyelid's muscle tone and tightness.

If your ectropion is caused by a scar, tumor, previous surgery or radiation, your doctor will examine the surrounding tissue as well.

Understanding how other conditions cause ectropion is important in choosing the correct treatment or surgical technique.

Jan. 20, 2016
References
  1. Yanoff M, et al., eds. Ectropion. In: Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Edinburgh, U.K.: Mosby Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 23, 2015.
  2. Damasceno RW, et al. Eyelid aging: Pathophysiology and clinical management. Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia. 2015;78:328.
  3. Goldman L, et al., eds. Diseases of the visual system. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 23, 2015.
  4. Ectropion — Eyelids that turn out. American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. http://www.asoprs.org/files/public/infoectropion.pdf. Accessed Nov. 23, 2015.
  5. Kaiser PK, et al., eds. Lids, lashes, and lacrimal system. In: The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Illustrated Manual of Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 23, 2015.
  6. AskMayoExpert. Eye surgery. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.