Overview

Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many cases, death. Both viruses are native to Africa, where sporadic outbreaks have occurred for decades.

Ebola virus and Marburg virus live in animal hosts, and humans can contract the viruses from infected animals. After the initial transmission, the viruses can spread from person to person through contact with body fluids or contaminated needles.

No drug has been approved to treat either virus. People diagnosed with Ebola or Marburg virus receive supportive care and treatment for complications. Scientists are coming closer to developing vaccines for these deadly diseases.

July 15, 2017
References
  1. Ebola (Ebola virus disease). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  2. Ebola (Ebola virus disease): Sierra Leone trial to introduce a vaccine against Ebola (STRIVE) questions and answers. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/strive/qa.html. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  3. Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/marburg/. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  4. Bray M, et al. Epidemiology pathogenesis of Ebola virus disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  5. Bray M, et al. Treatment and prevention of Ebola virus disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  6. Bray M, et al. Clinical manifestation and diagnosis of Ebola virus disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.
  7. Bray M. Marburg virus. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 31, 2017.